A dialogue between nature and architecture

Like a long take in filmmaking, walking from the lobby to the gardens will have travellers holding their breath. One of a kind, La Mamounia gardens are famous and legendary in equal measure. They provide a sweeping panorama of triumphant nature stretching over 8 hectares and lulled by melodious birdsong. The eyes are drawn to the horizon, where you can make out the rooftops of the Medina, the Koutoubia Mosque, and the Atlas mountains in the distance.

Delimited by 12th century ramparts, the park is dotted with hundreds of olive trees, some of which are more than 700 years’ old. Bougainvilleas, cacti, delphiniums and jacarandas keep company with orange trees, palm trees, rose bushes and lemon trees in a mesmerising interplay of light and shade, wild groves and perfectly organised avenues of trees.

Wildly staged order reigns where Barbary fig trees meet Madagascar periwinkles in a joyous visual cacophony. Only seasonal flowers disrupt the appearance, where humans conduct this natural orchestra in an incomparable symphony of diverse scents and colours.

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The incredibly abundant vegetable garden spans 1,500 m² of land cultivated with organic compost. It boasts 30 species of thriving vegetables and aromatic plants that are harvested for use in La Mamounia’s four restaurants.

Thanks to our gardeners’ knowledge, the vegetable gardens include 15 tomato varieties, courgettes, small crunchy radishes, pumpkins, beetroot, carrots, and other vegetables cooked to perfection by our chefs. The fig and peach trees emanate their delicious scents alongside orange and lime trees – an extremely rare variety in Morocco.

The pillars of Moroccan and Mediterranean cuisine, aromatic plants such as coriander, verbena, mint varieties (peppermint, creeping mint, etc.), basil and oregano are found as you stroll through the gardens, offering a palette of unrivalled flavours to the dishes of La Mamounia’s four restaurants.

“Enjoy service to perfection in the heart of the magnificent La Mamounia gardens.”

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